dcsimg

EN | FR | 中文 | RU

 

THE AYEYARWADY

Also known as ‘’The Elephant River’’, it has been a lifeline as well as the keeper of secrets to its nation. The Ayeyarwady River begins at the top of the snow-capped Himalayas then flows through roughly 1.550km passing through the center of Myanmar, then throwing itself into the Andaman Sea. Hundreds if not thousands of temples, stupas and nats can be seen on its banks. Many flock down to this river for its legendary beauty but also to find lost pieces of the past.

Burma’s turbulent past and political isolation has made travelers and discoverers in the past weary of adventuring onto the land. But no more! Myanmar has been reborn and welcomes each individual with open arms; eager to start a new chapter with the world and to let its people and culture surprise you with stories and a brand new experience.

Legends and folklore of how this waterway has come to be have been passed down from generation to generation to keep the spirit of the ever-giving river alive.

From kings to modern day artists, this river continues to astonish and inspire those who come across its path.

THE AYEYARWADY

MYANMAR

In Myanmar lies some of the world’s most enriching and majestic heritage. From the beautiful and unique traditions, to jaw dropping architectural marvels. With centuries of fascinating history and the grace of its people, this country unlike any other has managed to set itself aside.

MYANMAR

BAGAN

Ancient chronicles suggest Bagan to have been the cultural and economic capital of the Pagan Empire in the 9th century. This fairy-tale like city is home to over 2,000 monuments over the vast plain. The exquisite scenery of these thousands of temples, stupas and pagodas will take more than your breath away. Bagan was made to amaze and inspire locals as well as travelers.

BAGAN

MANDALAY

The bustling capital of Myanmar is acclaimed for its colorful arts, religious heritage and awe-inspiring temples. Made famous to westerners by Rudyard Kipling’s poem of the same name “TMandalay”. A city with an amazing patrimonial background, having been colonized by the British and raided during the second World War. Mandalay’s diverse history renders it a charming city where many of its secrets have yet to be discovered.

MANDALAY

ROYAL CITIES

These Royal cities were once the historical capitals of the country. These destinations offer not only a cultural background but each also has its own incredible story in history. Mingun bestows travelers and residents one of the most architecturally beautiful and impressive Buddhist sanctuaries, the Hsinbyume Pagoda. Amarapura is home to a remarkable teak bridge. About 1.2Km long and built with over a thousand teak tiles. The bridge is known for romantic strolls during twilight hours. Sagaing is celebrated for its many monasteries and tranquil charms of its main city center. Ava, a former imperial capital of successive Burmese kingdoms from the 14th to the 19th centuries, can be visited by horse drawn cart.

ROYAL CITIES

TANT KYI TAUNG

Across the river from Bagan lies the Tant Kyi Pagoda, also known as “The Glass Monastery”, 4th pillar of Bagan temples, rarely visited. This sacred relic was imagined by King Anawratha himself in 1059 A.D. Visitors and monks alike gather atop the hill site to capture the beautiful skyline of Myanmar.

TANT KYI TAUNG

AVA

Ava, formerly known as Inwa, is the ancient imperial capital of successive Burmese kingdoms from the 14th to 19th centuries, situated 20km south of Mandalay. It has been destroyed and rebuilt numerous times, and finally abandonned in 1839, after an earthquake. Today, people wander around the remains of its glory and the nature that invaded it on the back of a horse draw cart.

AVA